Villa Sea and Archaeology, WITH POOL IN SICILY, SALT...

Sicily is a crossroads of the Mediterranean,

Sicily is a crossroads of the Mediterranean, so expect hints of exotic spices like saffron and cinnamon paired with local ingredients-lemons, blood oranges, fresh citron, almonds, capers, and wild mountain oregano

 

ITINERARIES:
A Culinary Tour of Sicily
Sicily is a crossroads of the Mediterranean, so expect hints of exotic spices like saffron and cinnamon paired with local ingredients-lemons, blood oranges, fresh citron, almonds, capers, and wild mountain oregano. Palermo's markets, located on the northern coast, are reminiscent of an Arabian bazaar, with three-wheeled trucks piled high with produce, vendors hawking goods in sicilian dialect, and street foods for sale (like panelle-fried chickpea flour-gristle sandwiches, and boiled octopus with a squirt of lemon). The Vucceria market draws the most tourists (even if nowdays it is smaller than in the past), so head to Ballaro' or Capo, as the natives do. The market in Catania is also well worth a visit if you're on the island's eastern coast. You'll find swordfish with swords, silvery blue sardines in mounds, live shrimp in shells, and whole hunks of tuna that look more like beef than fish.
Sicily's western coast (south of Trapani) is decorated with windmills, flamingos, rectangular saltpans, and mounds covered with terra cotta roof tiles. Another Sicilian specialties: capers, caper paste, zibibbo raisins, raisin jelly, and vegetables.

 


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